New Arrivals in the Law Library...
October 2012


TRIED AND CONVICTED : How Police, Prosecutors, and Judges Destroy Our Constitutional Rights
KF4749 .C525 2012
By Cicchini, Michael D.


When an individual is accused of a crime he is provided, at least in theory, with numerous constitutional rights throughout the legal process. These constitutional rights, however, are soft and flexible, and are subject to a tremendous amount of manipulation by police, prosecutors, and judges. The result is that these government agents are easily able to bypass, and in fact destroy, our constitutional protections.

This abuse of our fundamental rights is extremely dangerous. Far from being mere technicalities, constitutional rights benefit all citizens, not just the factually guilty, in ways that go unappreciated by most of us. In today's hyper-vigilant, tough-on-crime climate, many good people from all walks of life find themselves charged with serious crimes for behaving in ways that most of us would be shocked to learn are criminal. For these reasons, it is in all of our interests to ensure strong constitutional safeguards for everyone.

Tried and Convicted explains several individual constitutional rights that are intended to protect us from the vagaries of the criminal justice system, and gives detailed examples of how government agents routinely circumvent those rights. It also exposes the underlying problems that enable government agents to circumvent the constitution, and concludes by offering potential solutions to these problems. Using real life examples throughout, Cicchini provides a wake-up call for all of us.


THE OXFORD HANDBOOK OF COMPARATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL LAW 1ST ED.
K3165 .O965 2012


The field of comparative constitutional law has grown immensely over the past couple of decades. Once a minor and obscure adjunct to the field of domestic constitutional law, comparative constitutional law has now moved front and centre. Driven by the global spread of democratic government and the expansion of international human rights law, the prominence and visibility of the field, among judges, politicians, and scholars has grown exponentially. Even in the United States, where domestic constitutional exclusivism has traditionally held a firm grip, use of comparative constitutional materials has become the subject of a lively and much publicized controversy among various justices of the U.S. Supreme Court. The trend towards harmonization and international borrowing has been controversial. Whereas it seems fair to assume that there ought to be great convergence among industrialized democracies over the uses and functions of commercial contracts, that seems far from the case in constitutional law. Can a parliamentary democracy be compared to a presidential one? A federal republic to a unitary one? Moreover, what about differences in ideology or national identity? Can constitutional rights deployed in a libertarian context be profitably compared to those at work in a social welfare context? Is it perilous to compare minority rights in a multi-ethnic state to those in its ethnically homogeneous counterparts? These controversies form the background to the field of comparative constitutional law, challenging not only legal scholars, but also those in other fields, such as philosophy and political theory. Providing the first single-volume, comprehensive reference resource, the Oxford Handbook of Comparative Constitutional Law will be an essential road map to the field for all those working within it, or encountering it for the first time. Leading experts in the field examine the history and methodology of the discipline, the central concepts of constitutional law, constitutional processes, and institutions - from legislative reform to judicial interpretation, rights, and emerging trends.


THE VOTING WARS : From Florida 2000 to the Next Election
KF4886 .H39 2012
By Hasen, Richard L.


In 2000, just a few hundred votes out of millions cast in the state of Florida separated Republican presidential candidate George W. Bush from his Democratic opponent, Al Gore. The outcome of the election rested on Florida's 25 electoral votes, and legal wrangling continued for 36 days. Then, abruptly, one of the most controversial Supreme Court decisions in U.S. history, Bush v. Gore, cut short the battle. Since the Florida debacle we have witnessed a partisan war over election rules. Election litigation has skyrocketed, and election time brings out inevitable accusations by political partisans of voter fraud and voter suppression. These allegations have shaken public confidence, as campaigns deploy "armies of lawyers" and the partisan press revs up when elections are expected to be close and the stakes are high.

Richard L. Hasen, a respected authority on election law, chronicles and analyzes the battles over election rules from 2000 to the present. From a nonpartisan standpoint he explores the rising number of election-related lawsuits and charges of voter fraud as well as the decline of public confidence in fair results. He explains why future election disputes will be worse than previous ones-more acrimonious, more distorted by unsubstantiated allegations, and amplified by social media. No reader will fail to conclude with Hasen that election reform is an urgent priority, one that demands the attention of conscientious citizens and their elected representatives.


SPEECH AND HARM: Controversies over Free Speech
JC591 .S67 2012


Most liberal societies are deeply committed to a principle of free speech. At the same time, however, there is evidence that some kinds of speech are harmful in ways that are detrimental to important liberal values, such as social equality. Might a genuine commitment to free speech require that we legally permit speech even when it is harmful, and even when doing so is in conflict with our commitment to values like equality? Even if such speech is to be legally permitted, does our commitment to free speech allow us to provide material and institutional support to those who would contest such harmful speech? And finally, and perhaps most importantly, which kinds of speech are harmful in ways that merit response, either in the form of legal regulation or in some other form?

This collection explores these and related questions. Drawing on expertise in philosophy, sociology, political science, feminist theory, and legal theory, the contributors to this book investigate these themes and questions. By exploring various categories of speech (including pornography, hate speech, Holocaust denial literature, "Whites Only" signs), and attending to the precise functioning of speech, the essays contained here shed light on these questions by clarifying the relationship between speech and harm. Understanding how speech functions can help us work out which kinds of speech are harmful, what those harms are, and how the speech in question brings them about. All of these issues are crucially important when it comes to deciding what ought to be done about allegedly harmful speech.


BUYING AMERICA FROM THE INDIANS: From Florida 2000 to the Next Election
KF228.J644 W38 2012
By Watson, Blake A.


The U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Johnson v. McIntosh established the basic principles that govern American Indian property rights to this day. In the case, more than one Anglo-American purchaser claimed title to the same land in what is now southern Illinois. The Piankeshaw Indians had deeded the land twice-once to speculators in 1775, and again, thirty years later, to the United States by treaty. The Court decided in favor of William McIntosh, who had bought the land from the U.S. government. Writing for the majority, Chief Justice John Marshall declared that the "discovery" of America had given "exclusive title to those who made it"-namely, the European colonizers. According to Johnson, the Piankeshaws did not own what they thought was their land. Indeed, no Indian tribe did.

Johnson v. McIntosh and its impact offers a comprehensive historical and legal overview of Native land rights since the European discovery of the New World. Watson sets the case in rich historical context. After tracing Anglo-American views of Native land rights to their European roots, Watson explains how speculative ventures in Native lands affected not only Indian peoples themselves but the causes and outcomes of the French and Indian War, the American Revolution, and ratification of the Articles of Confederation. He then focuses on the transactions at issue in Johnson between the Illinois and Piankeshaw Indians, who sold their homelands, and the future shareholders of the United Illinois and Wabash Land Companies.


PUNISHMENT, PARTICIPATORY DEMOCRACY, AND THE JURY
KF8972 .D98 2012
By Dzur, Albert W.


Focusing contemporary democratic theory on the neglected topic of punishment, Punishment, Participatory Democracy, and the Jury argues for increased civic engagement in criminal justice as an antidote to the American penal state. Albert W. Dzur considers how the jury, rather than merely expressing unreflective public opinion, may serve as a participatory institution that gathers and utilizes citizens' juridical capabilities. In doing so, the book resists trends in criminal justice scholarship that blame increases in penal severity on citizen participation and rejects political theorists' longstanding skepticism of lay abilities.

Dzur distinguishes constructive citizen involvement that takes responsibility for public problems from a mass politics mobilized superficially around single issues. This more positive view of citizen action, which was once a major justification for the jury trial, is now also manifest in the restorative justice movement, which has incorporated lay people into community boards and sentencing circles. Both jury trials and restorative justice programs, Dzur explains, are examples of rational disorganization, in which lay citizen action renders a process less efficient yet also contributes valuable qualities such as attunement, reflectiveness, and full-bodied communication. While restorative justice programs and participatory policy forums such as citizens' juries have become attractive to reformers, traditional juries have suffered a steep and troubling decline. Punishment, Participatory Democracy, and the Jury advocates a broader role for jurors in the criminal courts and more widespread use of jury trials.

Though no panacea for a political culture grown too comfortable with criminalization and incarceration, participatory institutional designs that rationally disorganize punishment practices and slow down criminal justice can catalyze civic responsibility and public awareness about the need to find alternative paths forward for America's broken penal system.


THE RIGHT OF NONUSE
K3478 .L35 2012
By Laitos, Jan.


The Right of Nonuse provides a fresh and remarkably different perspective on the real causes of the ills plaguing the world's resources and environment. It re-examines the very nature of nature, and from this new perspective, argues that what is needed is for humans to grant to natural resources a legal right to be left alone - a right of nonuse. In the process, it explores the following questions: Why do natural resources continue to be depleted and removed at an alarming rate? Why are species becoming extinct at a pace that may be unprecedented? Why does the environment continue to be polluted? Why do the weather and climate seem to be changing? Perhaps most important, why have laws, legal institutions and governments been unable to address and correct these problems?

Jan Laitos reviews the history of our relationship with the natural environment and develops new ways of thinking about nature and its protection. Instead of proceeding with human-based goals, Laitos argues that we should protect environmental resources for their own intrinsic value. Instead of giving humans more and more rights to clean up the environment, and to halt resources depletion, a right of nonuse held by the resource itself should be created. Natural resources have always possessed this parallel nonuse function, and society should recognize and legitimize it.


PATENT AND TRADE DISPARITIES IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
K1505 .R34 2012
Ragavan, Srividhya.


For developing countries, the concept of sustainable development, as opposed to rapid pockets of development, embodies great promise for socio-political reasons. Most analyses of development, however, have focused on either trade mechanisms or intellectual-property regimes, which has resulted in overly narrow and sometimes paradoxical conclusions, with corresponding policy measures that have promised far more than they can deliver. While each of these mechanisms has benefits and disadvantages, questions about how they would interact and what kind of results they produce remain largely unexplored. Similarly, almost all of these regimes provide generalized solutions that developing countries tend to denounce as ill-fitting. There are several flexibilities that can be used as effective tools, but knowing which flexibility applies best to what context remains contentious. In Patent and Trade Disparities in Developing Countries, Srividhya Ragavan examines the interaction between trade and intellectual property regimes (using the patent regime in India as the focal point) in an integrated developmental framework to determine whether and how sustainable economic growth can be achieved in developing countries. This book examines a number of important questions: Is compulsory licensing the best way to provide access to medication or is patent protection more efficient? Should innovation in plant breeding be protected at all? If so, should it be using patents or a sui generis mechanism?


REGULATORY BREAKDOWN: The Crisis of Confidence in U.S. Regulation
KF1600 .R437 2012


Regulatory Breakdown: The Crisis of Confidence in U.S. Regulation brings fresh insight and analytic rigor to what has become one of the most contested domains of American domestic politics. Critics from the left blame lax regulation for the housing meltdown and financial crisis-not to mention major public health disasters ranging from the Gulf Coast oil spill to the Upper Big Branch Mine explosion. At the same time, critics on the right disparage an excessively strict and costly regulatory system for hampering economic recovery. With such polarized accounts of regulation and its performance, the nation needs now more than ever the kind of dispassionate, rigorous scholarship found in this book.

With chapters written by some of the nation's foremost economists, political scientists, and legal scholars, Regulatory Breakdown brings clarity to the heated debate over regulation by dissecting the disparate causes of the current crisis as well as analyzing promising solutions to what ails the U.S. regulatory system. This volume shows policymakers, researchers, and the public why they need to question conventional wisdom about regulation—whether from the left or the right-and demonstrates the value of undertaking systematic analysis before adopting policy reforms in the wake of disaster.


MORE ESSENTIAL THAN EVER: The Crisis of Confidence in U.S. Regulation
KF9630 .S38 2012
By Schulhofer, Stephen J.


When the states ratified the Bill of Rights in the eighteenth century, the Fourth Amendment seemed straightforward. It requires that government respect the right of citizens to be "secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures." Of course, "papers and effects" are now digital and thus more vulnerable to government spying. But the biggest threat may be our own weakening resolve to preserve our privacy.

In this potent new volume in Oxford's Inalienable Rights series, legal expert Stephen J. Schulhofer argues that the Fourth Amendment remains, as the title says, more essential than ever. From data-mining to airport body scans, drug testing and aggressive police patrolling on the streets, privacy is under assault as never before--and we're simply getting used to it. But the trend is threatening the pillars of democracy itself, Schulhofer maintains. "Government surveillance may not worry the average citizen who reads best-selling books, practices a widely accepted religion, and adheres to middle-of-the-road political views," he writes. But surveillance weighs on minorities, dissenters, and unorthodox thinkers, "chilling their freedom to read what they choose, to say what they think, and to associate with others who are like-minded." All of us are affected, he adds. "When unrestricted search and surveillance powers chill speech and religion, inhibit gossip and dampen creativity, they undermine politics and impoverish social life for everyone." Schulhofer offers a rich account of the history and nuances of Fourth Amendment protections, as he examines such issues as street stops, racial profiling, electronic surveillance, data aggregation, and the demands of national security. The Fourth Amendment, he reminds us, explicitly authorizes invasions of privacy--but it requires justification and accountability, requirements that reconcile public safety with liberty.


THE OATH: The Obama White House and the Supreme Court
KF8742 .T66 2012
By Toobin, Jeffrey.


From the moment John Roberts, the chief justice of the United States, blundered through the Oath of Office at Barack Obama's inauguration, the relationship between the Supreme Court and the White House has been confrontational. Both men are young, brilliant, charismatic, charming, determined to change the course of the nation-and completely at odds on almost every major constitutional issue. One is radical; one essentially conservative. The surprise is that Obama is the conservative-a believer in incremental change, compromise, and pragmatism over ideology. Roberts-and his allies on the Court-seek to overturn decades of precedent: in short, to undo the ultimate victory FDR achieved in the New Deal.

This ideological war will crescendo during the 2011-2012 term, in which several landmark cases are on the Court's docket-most crucially, a challenge to Obama's controversial health-care legislation. With four new justices joining the Court in just five years, including Obama's appointees Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan, this is a dramatically-and historically-different Supreme Court, playing for the highest of stakes.

No one is better positioned to chronicle this dramatic tale than Jeffrey Toobin, whose prize-winning bestseller The Nine laid bare the inner workings and conflicts of the Court in meticulous and entertaining detail. As the nation prepares to vote for President in 2012, the future of the Supreme Court will also be on the ballot.


Please select items you want to check out:

CLASSIFIED

(1)AFRICAN AMERICANS--CIVIL RIGHTS--HISTORY.
Houston, Charles Hamilton. Charles H. Houston : an interdisciplinary study of civil rights leadership. Lanham, Md. : Lexington Books, c2012. KF4757 .H66 2012

(2)AIDS (DISEASE)--PATIENTS--LEGAL STATUS, LAWS, ETC.--UNITED STATES.
HIV & AIDS benchbook. 2nd ed. Chicago : American Bar Association, AIDS Coordinating Committee, c2012. KF3803.A54 H578 c2012

(3) ANIMAL EXPERIMENTATION--LAW AND LEGISLATION--CONGRESSES.
International animal research regulations : impact on neuroscience research : workshop summary. Washington, D.C. : National Academies Press, c2012. QL55 .I46 2011

(4) BLAISDELL, JOHN HOYT, 1888-1975--TRIALS, LITIGATION, ETC.
Fliter, John A. Fighting foreclosure : the Blaisdell case, the contract clause, and the Great Depression. Lawrence, Kan. : University Press of Kansas, c2012. KF228.B575 F55 2012

(5) CATHOLIC CHURCH--CLERGY--SEXUAL BEHAVIOR--DELAWARE. Neuberger, Thomas S. When priests become predators : profiles of childhood sexual abuse survivors. Wilmington, Del. : T.S. Neuberger, c2012. BX1912.9 .N48 2012

(6) CIVIL LAW SYSTEMS.
Mixed jurisdictions worldwide : the third legal family. 2nd ed. Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, c2012. K585 .M59 2012

(7)CIVIL RIGHTS--UNITED STATES.
Cicchini, Michael D. Tried and convicted : how police, prosecutors, and judges destroy our constitutional rights. Lanham : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, c2012. KF4749 .C525 2012

(8) CLIMATIC CHANGES--LAW AND LEGISLATION.
Climate change from a criminological perspective. New York : Springer, c2012. K3585.5.A6 C56 2012

(9)CLIMATIC CHANGES--LAW AND LEGISLATION--UNITED STATES.
The law of adaptation to climate change : U.S. and international aspects. 1st ed. Chicago : American Bar Association, c2012. K3585.5 .L39 2012

(10)CONSTITUTIONAL LAW.
The Oxford handbook of comparative constitutional law. 1st ed. Oxford, U.K. : Oxford University Press, c2012. K3165 .O965 2012

(11)CONSTITUTIONAL LAW--UNITED STATES.
Vile, John R. The writing and ratification of the U.S. Constitution : practical virtue in action. Lanham, Md. : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, c2012. KF4541 .V555 2012

(12) COPYRIGHT--MUSIC--UNITED STATES.
Parks, Kevin. Music & copyright in America : toward the celestial jukebox. Chicago, Ill. : American Bar Association, Section of Intellectual Property Law, c2012. KF3035 .P37 2012

(13) ELECTION LAW--UNITED STATES.
Hasen, Richard L. The voting wars : from Florida 2000 to the next election meltdown. New Haven : Yale University Press, c2012. KF4886 .H39 2012

(14) FEDERAL GOVERNMENT--UNITED STATES.
Banks, Christopher P. The U.S. Supreme Court and new federalism : from the Rehnquist to the Roberts court. Lanham, Md. : Rowman & Littlefield, c2012. KF4600 .B36 2012

(15) FREEDOM OF SPEECH--SOCIAL ASPECTS.
Speech and harm : controversies over free speech. 1st ed. Oxford, U.K. : Oxford University Press, c2012. JC591 .S67 2012

(16) GITLOW, BENJAMIN, 1891-1965--TRIALS, LITIGATION, ETC.
Lendler, Marc. Gitlow v. New York : every idea an incitement. Lawrence, Kan. : University Press of Kansas, c2012. KF228.G58 L46 2012

(17) GRAND JURY--UNITED STATES--HISTORY--18TH CENTURY.
Gentlemen of the grand jury : the surviving grand jury charges from colonial, state, and lower federal courts before 1801. Durham, N.C. : Carolina Academic Press, c2012. KF9642 .G46 2012

(18) HOMOPHOBIA--LAW AND LEGISLATION--UNITED STATES.
Charles, Casey. Critical queer studies : law, film, and fiction in contemporary American culture. Farnham, Surrey, UK ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate Pub., c2012. KF4754.5 .C47 2012

(19) INDIANS OF NORTH AMERICA--CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM.
Champagne, Duane. Captured justice : Native nations and Public Law 280. Durham, N.C. : Carolina Academic Press, N.C. c2012. KF8210.

(20) INDIGENOUS PEOPLES--CIVIL RIGHTS.
Pulitano, Elvira. Indigenous rights in the age of the UN declaration. Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, c 2012. K3247 .P85 2012

(21)INTERACTIVE MULTIMEDIA--LAW AND LEGISLATION--UNITED STATES.
Internet law for the business lawyer. Second edition. KF390.5.C6 I569 2012

(22) INTERNET SERVICE PROVIDERS--LAW AND LEGISLATION--UNITED STATES.
Bagwell, Dana D. An open Internet for all : free speech and network neutrality. El Paso : LFB Scholarly Pub. LLC, 2012. KF2765 .B34 2012

(23) INTERRACIAL MARRIAGE--LAW AND LEGISLATION--UNITED STATES.
Loving v. Virginia in a post-racial world : rethinking race, sex, and marriage. New York : Cambridge University Press, c2012. KF517 .L68 2012

(24) (24) ISLAMIC COURTS--NIGERIA, NORTHERN.
Ibrahim, Hauwa. Practicing Shariah law : seven strategies for achieving justice in Shariah courts. Chicago, Ill. : American Bar Association, c2012. KTA3474 .I27 2012

(25) JOHNSON, JOSHUA, FL. 1819--TRIALS, LITIGATION, ETC.
Watson, Blake A. Buying America from the Indians : Johnson v. McIntosh and the history of native land rights. Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2012. KF228.J644 W38 2012

(26)JUDGES--UNITED STATES--ELECTION.
Gibson, James L. Electing judges : the surprising effects of campaigning on judicial legitimacy. Chicago ; London : University of Chicago Press, c2012. KF8776 .G538 2012

(27) JUDICIAL PROCESS--UNITED STATES--STATES.
Tarr, G. Alan. Without fear or favor : judicial independence and judicial accountability in the states. Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, c2012. KF8736 .T373 2012

(28) JUDICIAL REVIEW OF ADMINISTRATIVE ACTS.
Daly, Paul. A theory of deference in administrative law : basis, application, and scope. Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, c2012. K3412 .D35 2012

(29) JURY--UNITED STATES.
Dzur, Albert W. Punishment, participatory democracy, and the jury. New York : Oxford University Press, c2012. KF8972 .D98 2012

(30) JURY--UNITED STATES--DECISION MAKING.
Devine, Dennis J. Jury decision making : the state of the science. New York : New York University Press, c2012. KF8972 .D48 2012

(31) LAW--POLITICAL ASPECTS.
New critical legal thinking : law and the political. Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon ; New York : Birkbeck Law Press, c2012. K487.P65 N49 2012

(32) LAW--STUDY AND TEACHING--UNITED STATES.
The unofficial guide to U.S. legal studies : for foreign lawyers. Chicago, Ill. : ABA Section of International Law : American Bar Association, Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar, c2012. KF283 .U56 2012

(33) LAW--VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE--UNITED STATES.
Careers in international law. 4th ed. [Chicago, Ill.] : American Bar Association, Section of International Law, c2012. KF299.T73 C37 2012

(34) MENTAL HEALTH LAWS.
Mental health and human rights : vision, praxis, and courage. 1st ed. Oxford, U.K. : Oxford University Press, c2012. K640 .M39 2012

(35) NATURAL RESOURCES--LAW AND LEGISLATION.
Laitos, Jan. The right of nonuse. Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, c2012. K3478 .L35 2012

(36) NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS--LAW AND LEGISLATION--UNITED STATES.
Guidebook for directors of nonprofit corporations. 3rd ed. Chicago, IL : American Bar Association, Section of Business Law, c2012. KF1388.7 .G85 2012

(37) PATENT LAWS AND LEGISLATION--DEVELOPING COUNTRIES.
Ragavan, Srividhya. Patent and trade disparities in developing countries. New York : Oxford University Press, c2012. K1505 .R34 2012

(38) PRIVACY, RIGHT OF--UNITED STATES.
United States. The information privacy law sourcebook. Chicago, IL : American Bar Association, c2012. KF1263.C65 A3 2012

(39) PUBLIC INTEREST LAW--DEVELOPING COUNTRIES.
Law against the state : ethnographic forays into law's transformations. K564.P83 L39 2012

(40) SAME-SEX MARRIAGE--LAW AND LEGISLATION--UNITED STATES.
Stein, Edward. The evolving definition of marriage. New York, N.Y. : Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Yeshiva University, c2012 KF539 .S84 2012

(41) SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP.
Social entrepreneurship in the age of atrocities : changing our world. Cheltenham, UK ; Northampton, MA : Edward Elgar, c2012. HD60 .S62 2012

(42) TAMANAHA, BRIAN Z.. FAILING LAW SCHOOLS.
Failing law schools [videorecording]. Andover, Mass. : Massachusetts School of Law, c2012. KF272 .T3534 2012

(43) TRADE REGULATION--UNITED STATES--EVALUATION.
Regulatory breakdown : the crisis of confidence in U.S. regulation. Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2012. KF1600 .R437 2012

(44) UNITED STATES. CONSTITUTION.
Schulhofer, Stephen J. More essential than ever : the Fourth Amendment in the twenty-first century. Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, c2012. KF9630 .S38 2012

(45) UNITED STATES. SUPREME COURT--HISTORY--21ST CENTURY.
Toobin, Jeffrey. The oath : the Obama White House and the Supreme Court. 1st ed. New York : Doubleday, c2012. KF8742 .T66 2012

(46) VICTIMS--LEGAL STATUS, LAWS, ETC.
Fernandez de Casadevante Romani, Carlos. International law of victims. Berlin ; Heidelberg : Springer, c2012. K5572 .F47 2012

(47) WOMEN JUDGES--UNITED STATES.
Kenney, Sally Jane. Gender and justice : why women in the judiciary really matter. New York : Routledge, 2013. KF8775 .K46 2013

(48) WOMEN--LEGAL STATUS, LAWS, ETC.--ISLAMIC COUNTRIES.
Self-determination and women's rights in Muslim societies. Waltham, Mass. : Brandeis University Press, c2012. 644 .S45 2012

(49) WOMEN'S RIGHTS--DEVELOPING COUNTRIES--CASE STUDIES.
Kristof, Nicholas D. Half the sky : turning oppression into opportunity for women worldwide. 1st Vintage Books ed. New York : Vintage Books, 2010, c2009. HQ1236.5.D44 K74 2010




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